About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
's self-defense that the society enables through regulations, through laws that have passed, through norms it tries to establish. and one of the big things that is missing from this debate, we can go back and forth and have a conversation about whether armed security would stop anything from happening, didn't help in columbine, but the bigger question is, we as a society, what does this say when you want to put more guns in your place of education, in your place where you send your 5, 6, 7-year-old children? is that the message, the sort of society that we want to be? or do we want to take self-defense before the moment of conflict? do we want to look at legislation? do we want to put policies in place that allow us to defend ourselves before we get to a point where we say, i wish that teacher had it. by the time we get to that point, it was too late. >> hailey, were your surprised by the press conference? >> i have been optimistic for the official statement all week, and i have to say i was very disappointed. i think that their statement was a pretty huge disservice to their membership an
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will
used in crimes that would be not law-abiding gun use. they would support amendments to carry guns on amtrak, national parks and bars and what i would call the notorious stand your ground legislation. do you think that agenda, if it has more exposure in this debate, i mean if the president read off those things in the state of the union, do you think that would drive a wedge between the average gun owner and the nra's national agenda? >> it would start a debate. look, it's not the job of reporters to carry one side of an argument. if the nra is making an argument and no one is making one against them, it has a consequence for the debate. what the gun control side has lacked for a long time is a powerful grassroots group that actually has the muscle and the money to force the conversation, to force leaders and lawmakers and presidents to talk about it. so you don't have a solution or problems -- >> i think we're abdicating responsibility there. we talk about, you know, far right and left and act like we're having a balanced debate. it's rare we go through statistics and teach the su
on leave yesterday. he is being questioned by law. >>> police in northeast california say they have arrested a teen for planning a school shooting. the 15-year-old allegedly plotted to shoot a class full of students. the boy talked about it as police were investigating him for pull age knife on his parents. he is being held in a mental health facility. >>> a 14-year-old was arrested for a similar alleged plot in visa, lia. his school district said he threatened to shoot up mount whitney. investigators say it was part of a gang initiatation and the boy is charged with making terrorist threats. the high schools have increased security. >> the nra has called for armed guards in all united states schools and many say those officers are already in place. oakland, san francisco, the west contra costa school district all have armed officers. it costs about $5 million for 20 armed officers and 40 site supervisors. >> we have taken the approach but it's at a coast. it's at a steep cost when you talk about loss of supporting programs for music, its arts. >> the officials say they couldn't
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)